Dublin, Ireland

Upper Leeson Street Area Dublin Heritage Trail

Upper Leeson Street Area Dublin Heritage Trail

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57 tour stops

1

Leeson Street (Eustace) Bridge

Leeson Street Bridge, built in 1791 to link the city with the new suburb.

 
2

Upper Leeson Street

Upper Leeson Street opened up Dublin to a new suburb.

 
3

Mespil House

Now the site of a flats complex, Mespil House was originally a gracious townhouse.

 
4

1 Mespil Road

Sarah Purser, Artist (1848-1943) lived at Mespil House.

 
5

7 Mespil Road

Residence of the US Consul in Ireland.

 
6

35 Mespil Road

Home of Percy French.

 
7

Patrick Kavanagh commemoration bench

A bench commemorating Patrick Kavanagh by the canal near the Lock.

 
8

Baggot Street Bridge

Baggot Street Bridge built in 1791.

 
9

62 Pembroke Road

One of many places in the area where Patrick Kavanagh lived for a period.

 
10

US Embassy Elgin Road

The US Embassy, built in 1964.

 
11

Herbert Park

Covering 32 acres, Herbert Park has been open to the public since 1911.

 
12

Raglan Road

Raglan Road

 
13

St John’s House, HQ Knights of Malta

St John’s House at 32 Clyde Road, is the Irish headquarters of the Knights of Malta.

 
14

St Bartholomew's Church

St Bartholomew's Church, Church of Ireland.

 
15

Clyde, Elgin, Wellington & Pembroke Roads

This area was known at the end of the 19th century as “The Roads”.

 
16

19 Raglan Road: Patrick Kavanagh

Now the Mexican Embassy, Patrick Kavanagh lived here for a time.

 
17

19 Raglan Road (and the ICTU)

19 Raglan Road (and the ICTU)

 
18

41 Wellington Road: Jim & Delia Larkin

Jim Larkin, trade-unionist, lived here with his sister Delia, from 1935-1947

 
19

50 Wellington Road

Home of Professor Edward Dowden, poet and literary critic (1843-1913)

 
20

The Grove & Kathleen Goodfellow

A sanctuary for wildlife at the junction of Morehampton Road and Wellington Place.

 
21

73 Upper Leeson Street

Home to Lafcadio Hearn, author of Japanese folk tales and studies of Buddhism.

 
22

69 Leeson Street Upper

Home to P.L. Travers, creator of Mary Poppins

 
23

63 Upper Leeson Street

63 Upper Leeson Street, last occupied by Eoin McNeill

 
24

60 Upper Leeson Street

Home of John Mitchel, Young Irelander and editor of The Nation.

 
25

57 Leeson Street Upper

Home of Dr. Richard Best, National Library Director 1934-1940

 
26

92 Upper Leeson Street

Home to Carmencita Hederman, Councillor and Lord Mayor of Dublin from 1987.

 
27

48 Leeson Street Upper

Home of Robert Briscoe, Lord Mayor of Dublin

 
28

38 Upper Leeson Street

Home of The O'Rahilly who died in Easter 1916

 
29

Lisney's Estate Agents

Lisney's Estate Agents - one of the few modern buildings in the area.

 
30

Clayton Hotel Burlington Road

Built 1972, the hotel replaced an old estate house, Tullamaine Villa

 
31

O'Briens Pub

From 1942 run by Mick O'Brien for the classless society that was Leeson Street.

 
32

The Leeson Lounge

Pub with connection to Joyce and the Invincibles

 
33

143-147 Upper Leeson Street

A set of shops and businesses facing facing the traffic triangle.

 
34

Carnac Sculpture Upper Leeson Street

Carnac - sculpted in 1979 by Robert (Bob) Mulcahy.

 
35

130 Upper Leeson Street

A stretch of shops that have served the area since 1870.

 
36

Leeson Park

One of the finest streets built in the latter half of the 19th century.

 
37

Christ Church Leeson Park

Christ Church Leeson Park

 
38

Molyneux House

The second incarnation of an Asylum for Blind Females

 
39

Wesley House & Litton Hall

Now home to the Methodist Centenary Church

 
40

Fitzwilliam Lawn Tennis Club

Fitzwilliam Lawn Tennis Club at Winton Road

 
41

Appian Way

Appian Way

 
42

5 Appian Way

Childhood home of Rosaleen Linehan

 
43

12 Appian Way

Where meetings of the first Dáil were held

 
44

Chelmsford Road

Extending from Appian Way to Ranelagh, Chelmsford Road was built in the late 1880s

 
45

30 Chelmsford Road

Home of Padraic Colum, poet, playwright, novelist

 
46

34 Chelmsford Road

Where Frank O'Connor wrote 'Guests of the Nation'

 
47

35 Chelmsford Road

Here the Hawke sisters listed their Religion as Suffragette in the 1911 Census

 
48

36 Chelmsford Road

Home to Rose Skeffington, mother of Frank Sheehy Skeffington

 
49

Deirdre Kelly memorial at Ranelagh Triangle

Deirdre Kelly, activist and author is remembered by a memorial at Ranelagh Triangle.

 
50

Ranelagh Train Station & Archway

Ranelagh Luas (tram) station arched bridge are remnants of the old Harcourt St line.

 
51

Ranelagh Gardens

Ranelagh Gardens

 
52

Northbrook Clinic

Now the Northbrook Clinic, No 15 was built as an 'Old Men's Asylum'.

 
53

12 Northbrook Road: Rev. Dr. Samuel Haughton

Home to Rev. Dr. Samuel Haughton, calculator of the humane hangman’s drop.

 
54

12 Northbrook Road: Prof. John Joly

Home to Prof. John Joly, one of Ireland's most eminent scientists.

 
55

Dartmouth Square

The last 19th-century square to be developed

 
56

61 Dartmouth Square

Home to Micheál MacLiammóir and Hilton Edwards in the 1930s.

 
57

27 Dartmouth Road

Here, in the 1911 census, Susan Manning listed her Religion as Militant Suffragette.

 

Overview

The area from the Grand Canal between Ranelagh Road and Baggot St, back to Pembroke Road and the Dodder, was built in the 100 years from 1791.
The new suburb was intended for the aspiring professional, military and administrative classes and their servants. From the mid-20th century, uncontrolled development saw houses split into flats, converted to offices and sometimes destroyed.
In 1968, a group of residents formed a residents' association, Ulsara. It has fought a sustained campaign to preserve the architecture and residential character of the area.
In producing this Heritage Trail, we hope to inform, enthuse and inspire you to value the history of the area.
Some content is adapted from Deirdre Kelly's 'Four Roads to Dublin', O'Brien Press, 2001. Other content is from our own research and other posts and publications. We have aimed to give credit where it is due, and apologise for any omissions.

Itinerary 7.1 km / 1:00

Offline map included

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