Newberg, United States

The Hoover-Minthorn House Museum

The Hoover-Minthorn House Museum

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29 tour stops

1

Parlor

Most formal room in the house. Off limits to the children and used for formal guests.

 
2

Hair Wreath

An art of love, honor, and friendship

 
3

Rocking Chairs

The best seat in the house

 
4

Medical Instruments and Textbooks

Not what you'd find in a doctor's office today

 
5

Dining Room

Doubled as a place to eat and a living room.

 
6

Tea Leaf China

Sturdy and elegant

 
7

Daisy Trueblood Letter

To a childhood sweetheart

 
8

Back Porch and Woodshed

Outside space with many uses

 
9

Laundry Agitator

An 1800s washing machine

 
10

Boot Jack

A simple, helpful tool

 
11

Herb Garden

For the kitchen and the doctor's office

 
12

Pear Tree

A new treat

 
13

Kitchen

Space where Laura cooked and taught her children and students to cook

 
14

Butter Molds

A necessary kitchen item

 
15

Butter Paddle

lishf

 
16

Pantry

From food to books

 
17

Master Bedroom

John and Laura's bedroom

 
18

Quaker Clothes

Typical Quaker dress

 
19

Sewing Machine

A unique brand

 
20

Girls Bedroom

Room shared by the older Minthorn girls

 
21

Tennessee's Doll

A favorite toy

 
22

Brown Dress

Typical children's clothes

 
23

Chamber Pots

An indoor bathroom

 
24

Friendship Quilts

A fun activity

 
25

Herbert Hoover's Bedroom

His very own room

 
26

Hoover's Fishing Rods

A favorite pastime

 
27

Account Book

A good record keeper

 
28

Bible Verses

Treasured Passages

 
29

Sunday School Class Picture

Lifelong friends

 

Overview

The Hoover-Minthorn House was one of the boyhood homes of Herbert Hoover, 31st president of the United States. The home was built in 1881 by Jesse Edwards who is considered the "Quaker Father of Newberg." Dr. Henry John Minthorn and his wife Laura moved into the house in 1885 and requested that their orphaned nephew, Herbert Hoover, come live with them. Hoover traveled to Oregon by train and spent the remainder of his childhood with the Minthorn family. Today, the house stands as a representation of rural life in the 1880s and as a place where Hoover spent his formative years developing beliefs and habits that would influence him throughout his career as an engineer, humanitarian, and politician.

Offline map included

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